Some words for hangover, like ours, refer prosaically to the cause: the Egyptians say they are “still drunk,” the Japanese “two days drunk,” the Chinese “drunk overnight.” The Swedes get “smacked from behind.” But it is in languages that describe the effects rather than the cause that we begin to see real poetic power. Salvadorans wake up “made of rubber,” the French with a “wooden mouth” or a “hair ache.” The Germans and the Dutch say they have a “tomcat,” presumably wailing. The Poles, reportedly, experience a “howling of kittens.” My favorites are the Danes, who get “carpenters in the forehead.” In keeping with the saying about the Eskimos’ nine words for snow, the Ukrainians have several words for hangover.

Hangovers, translated, from A Few Too Many

In honor of tonight’s overindulgence and tomorrow’s consequences, one of my favorite New Yorker essays of all time. 

(via pinwheeling)

To succeed in life, you need two things: ignorance and confidence.
― Mark Twain (via expiry)

flyichiro:

the other day we were discussing dating and this one dude was like “I don’t see the big deal why can’t people just ask people out without all the fuss” and another guy was like “well you get nervous and you get butterflies in your stomach ya know” and the first dude looked the other dude straight in the eye and said “DIGEST THEM.”

To one’s enemies: ‘I hate myself more than you ever could.’
― Alain de Botton (via durianquotes)